Discussion:
CP/M, CP/M+, PCP/M, MP/M, & Z-System
(too old to reply)
Leon Howell
2003-09-10 01:04:17 UTC
Permalink
Please excuse my inexcuseable ignorance, but could someone please tell
me *exactly* what CP/M+ & PCP/M do that CP/M 2.2 doesn't?

I know CP/M+ can handle tons of ram, but how much, and is it really
faster?

Is PCP/M really just menu driven CP/M+?

What does Z-System add?

Is MP/M an OS by it's self, or can it be added to CP/M+ or PCP/M?

Can any of these multitask?

I would also like some detailed info about T/Maker III, supposedly a
combination word proceccor, database & spreadsheet, and "Write Hand
Man" (I may not have the name write) a set of memory resident
accessories.
Barry Watzman
2003-09-10 03:39:56 UTC
Permalink
CP/M+ has quite a few features that CP/M does not. Whether it's faster
is an implementation issue; the features CAN be used to increase speed
(sometimes dramatically), but it's up to the implementor to use them
that way, it's not automatic.

The features include the ability to support larger files and devices,
the ability to do bank-switched memory, time and date stamping,
additional user interface features, ability to have a larger TPA by
bank-switching out part of the operating sytem itself, and support for
disk buffering and deblocking in the Operating system. There's more,
but that memory is over 20 years old.

MP/M and MP/M-86 are separate complete OS', they are not "add-ons" to to
the single user systems. These systems do multitask.

Right-hand Man was a competitor to my Perks program, which was basically
a sidekick-type program (Borland) for non-PC environments (although I
did a version of Perks for the PC in addition to the version for the
Zenith Z-100 systems). It contained functions like a calculator, a
small text editor, a modem program, a calendar, and ASCII code chart, etc.
Post by Leon Howell
Please excuse my inexcuseable ignorance, but could someone please tell
me *exactly* what CP/M+ & PCP/M do that CP/M 2.2 doesn't?
I know CP/M+ can handle tons of ram, but how much, and is it really
faster?
Is PCP/M really just menu driven CP/M+?
What does Z-System add?
Is MP/M an OS by it's self, or can it be added to CP/M+ or PCP/M?
Can any of these multitask?
I would also like some detailed info about T/Maker III, supposedly a
combination word proceccor, database & spreadsheet, and "Write Hand
Man" (I may not have the name write) a set of memory resident
accessories.
Salle Arobase
2003-09-10 12:46:43 UTC
Permalink
Hello, Leon!

Well, you ask quite a lot of questions in one time...
I am in hurry in this cybercafe, so excuse my short answers.
Post by Leon Howell
Please excuse my inexcuseable ignorance, but could someone please
tell me *exactly* what CP/M+ & PCP/M do that CP/M 2.2 doesn't?
CP/M 2.2 is now known as the "standard" version of CP/M.
However, you can spot CP/M Old Timers when they notice that
some ways of programming are no longer CP/M 1.4 compatible...
That means that, for them, CP/M 1.4 was the standard...
(In fact, the only "standard" CP/M disk format was the 8"...)

From your question, it seems that, for you, CP/M 2.2 was the
"standard". So, let us summarizes in one paragraph the differences:

- CP/M+ (usually known as "CP/M Plus") was made specifically
for hard disks and a faster CPU that Zilog never made: the Z-800.
With this powerfuller CPU, it was planned that CP/M Plus would
be still single-tasking, but with the ability of running 3 "background
tasks" (not showing on screen, like spool printing of files, etc).

- PCP/M (usually known as "Personal CP/M") was a counter-attack
from Digital Research against the wave of MSX computers made
by Microsoft and a Japanese society. It is "standard" CP/M 2.2,
but rewritten so has to boot from ROM, and with lots of program
menu-driven (rather than using "command lines" like the famous
"A>command filename.typ").
Post by Leon Howell
I know CP/M+ can handle tons of ram, but how much, and is it really
faster?
"tons of RAM" is maybe an exaggeration. By separating many,
many things in the BDOS and BIOS into 2 separate parts, called
the "Resident" and "Banked" (BDOS and BIOS), the usage of
top memory (known as FDOS to us, Old Timers) is much reduced.
It also depends on the number of "devices" supported.

You will be interested to know that the CP/M computer providing
the biggest TPA (63 KB) is not a CP/M Plus system, but a custom
version of CP/M 2.2, known as MultiFont CP/M 2.2, which was sold
in Europe by Epson for their Epson QX-10, the best Z-80 CP/M
micro ever made, in my opinion. (On the same QX-10, CP/M
Plus provides 61 KB of TPA.) (On the Amstrad PCW8256, CP/M
Plus provides 60 KB of TPA.)

"Is it really faster?" It depends from the implementations, but,
in general, I would say: YES. The reason is that, everytime
something is read from a disk, a copy is kept in RAM (usually
in one "Banked" area). Example: as long as you don't change
the disk in the drive, CP/M Plus scans the Directory NOT ON
THE DISK, BUT IN RAM!!! If you have the slightest idea of the
difference of speed between a disk access and a memory
access, you will instantly understand that, properly done, CP/M
Plus can "do circles" around a "standard" CP/M 2.2 implmentation
(even on the same hardware: it is only the OS that is different.
CP/M Plus was designed was huge directories used on hard disks).
Post by Leon Howell
Is PCP/M really just menu driven CP/M+?
No. It is booting from ROM and is not copied from CP/M Plus,
but from CP/M 2.2 (althought it has additional BDOS calls,
but that another story, since it was written after Digital Research
had made so much things that you do not mention (like GSX
and CP/NET)).
Post by Leon Howell
What does Z-System add?
The Z-System was a bastard of Unix and CP/M, exactly the same
as MS-DOS 2+ is a bastard of Unix and CP/M. (Technically,
MS-DOS v1 was a clone of CP/M...) Unix fans dismiss it.
CP/M fans find it repulsive. Only those who have not known the
originals can find them attractive.
Post by Leon Howell
Is MP/M an OS by it's self, or can it be added to CP/M+ or PCP/M?
MP/M is a CP/M-compatible multi-user multi-tasking OS.
In my opinion, it is the most impressive piece of software
ever developed on an 8-bit CPU. It could run 4 people
on a single Z-80 at 4 MHz...

(No, it cannot be added to CP/M Plus or Personal CP/M,
which are other (single-user) OSes.)
Post by Leon Howell
Can any of these multitask?
MP/M: yes. There was a 8086 version called MP/M-86,
then the name was changed to "Concurrent CP/M".
Most of the files that can be found on the Internet were
released from archives. The last owner of the rights to CP/M
says that most stuff was lost when Novell was the owner
of CP/M. Also, since Concurrent CP/M was running
on the IBM PC, they refused to release anything that
could still be used inside the last version (called DR DOS).
Post by Leon Howell
I would also like some detailed info about T/Maker III, supposedly a
combination word proceccor, database & spreadsheet, and "Write Hand
Man" (I may not have the name write) a set of memory resident
accessories.
- T/Maker III was, as you said, a combination. But I would said that
it was more a combination of spreadsheet and database. The
problem is that it was not very good nor impressive. Since the
programs doing only one task could contain more data, it faded
into obscurity. Its programmer continued to sold it privately during
many years. It was programmed in C, hence probably its slowness.

- Write Hand Man (WHM) is a mini-root staying in upper TPA.
When you press your system-dependent combination of keys,
you get a menu of some small utilities. (Personally, for a clock,
I prefer to have a clock next to my computer, and as for ASCII
table, I prefer to have it printed on paper...)
(Lee Hart mentioned WHM a short while ago. Maybe he could
provide you with more information, if you ask.)

Wew!

Yours Sincerely,
"French Luser"
Leon Howell
2003-09-10 20:39:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Salle Arobase
Well, you ask quite a lot of questions in one time...
I am in a hurry here at the library.
Post by Salle Arobase
I am in hurry in this cybercafe, so excuse my short answers.
I understand.
Post by Salle Arobase
The Z-System was a <XXX> of Unix and CP/M, exactly the same
as MS-DOS 2+ is a <XXX> of Unix and CP/M. (Technically,
MS-DOS v1 was a clone of CP/M...) Unix fans dismiss it.
CP/M fans find it repulsive. Only those who have not known the
originals can find them attractive.
Judging by what I've read here and in the Computer Journal, You'd
better leave town for a while...
Post by Salle Arobase
MP/M is a CP/M-compatible multi-user multi-tasking OS.
That's what I want. Where can I get a copy for my Bondwell Model 2?
Post by Salle Arobase
In my opinion, it is the most impressive piece of software ever developed on
an 8-bit CPU.
You should read about OS-9. It's my other second favorite os. (My
first favorite is Basic.)
Post by Salle Arobase
It could run 4 people on a single Z-80 at 4 MHz...
OS-9 does that on a 2 Mhz 6809. It's a lot of fun. How many tasks can
each user run under MP/M? (If it matters, The Bondwell I'm looking for
has 512k and one RS-232C port for a terminal)
Post by Salle Arobase
Post by Leon Howell
Can any of these multitask?
MP/M: yes. There was a 8086 version called MP/M-86,
I think I've had about enough of the i80x86/8. Can MP/M-80 multitask?

Here's some I forgot about: What are RP/M and RCP/M? Is CP/Net as os
or an upgrade? What network protocols does it use?
Nate Edel
2003-09-10 23:19:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leon Howell
Post by Salle Arobase
It could run 4 people on a single Z-80 at 4 MHz...
OS-9 does that on a 2 Mhz 6809. It's a lot of fun.
IIRC, 2Mhz 6809 has at least as much processing horsepower as a 4Mhz Z80.
--
Nate Edel http://www.nkedel.com/
"This is not a humorous tagline."
Leon Howell
2003-09-12 01:12:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nate Edel
Post by Leon Howell
Post by Salle Arobase
It could run 4 people on a single Z-80 at 4 MHz...
OS-9 does that on a 2 Mhz 6809. It's a lot of fun.
IIRC, 2Mhz 6809 has at least as much processing horsepower as a 4Mhz Z80.
I think the 6800, which was developed after the 8080, is supposed to
have a more efficient instruction set.(Hey look what *intel* did! Of
course we can do better than that...) Naturaly it's not compatible.
The 6809 has a 16-bit execution unit, so it's even faster. Zilog
apparently wanted to be compatible with the 8080, which was more
popular because it was there first. The Z80 is a good chip, especialy
considering what it had to be compatible with. I understand the i8080
was pretty slow compared to most others.

I think for what I want to do, the 4 Mhz Z80 is just as good as the 2
Mhz 6809. I just wish I could find that Bondwell Model 2. Anybody?
Nate Edel
2003-09-12 21:15:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leon Howell
course we can do better than that...) Naturaly it's not compatible.
The 6809 has a 16-bit execution unit, so it's even faster.
Zilog apparently wanted to be compatible with the 8080, which was more
popular because it was there first.
Didn't the original Zilog engineers come from Intel? Or is that apocrypha?
In any case, 8080 done better seems to have been the Z80s reason for being
(and it did a much better job of it than the 8085, from my memory.)
Post by Leon Howell
I think for what I want to do, the 4 Mhz Z80 is just as good as the 2
Mhz 6809. I just wish I could find that Bondwell Model 2. Anybody?
I never used the 6809, just read about it, but the big advantage to the Z80
is the amount of software already written for it. And writing in assembly
was a lot easier in the Z80 than the 6502 which has a _really_ minimal
register set. I can't remember how the 6800 or 6809 were, since I never
worked with aseembly for either.
--
Nate Edel http://www.nkedel.com/
"This is not a humorous tagline."
Charles Richmond
2003-09-13 05:47:41 UTC
Permalink
[snip...] [snip...] [snip...]
I never used the 6809, just read about it, but the big advantage to the Z80
is the amount of software already written for it. And writing in assembly
was a lot easier in the Z80 than the 6502 which has a _really_ minimal
register set. I can't remember how the 6800 or 6809 were, since I never
worked with aseembly for either.
IMHO the 6809 had a wonderful instruction set...especially
compared to the Z80 or 6502...or even the 6800. I encourage
you to Google the "MC6809" and read up on it...

--
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
| Charles and Francis Richmond richmond at plano dot net |
+----------------------------------------------------------------+
Dosius
2003-09-13 11:56:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nate Edel
I never used the 6809, just read about it, but the big advantage to the Z80
is the amount of software already written for it. And writing in assembly
was a lot easier in the Z80 than the 6502 which has a _really_ minimal
register set. I can't remember how the 6800 or 6809 were, since I never
worked with aseembly for either.
6502 was a 6800 clone IIRC.

-uso.
Michael J. Mahon
2003-09-13 21:21:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dosius
6502 was a 6800 clone IIRC.
Only in some electrical sense--its architecture is quite different.

-michael

Check out amazing quality sound for 8-bit Apples on my
Home page: http://members.aol.com/MJMahon/
Lee Hart
2003-09-13 21:08:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nate Edel
Didn't the original Zilog engineers come from Intel?
Yes. Federico Faggin was a lead engineer at Intel on the design of the
4004 thru 8080. Intel had (and still does have) a habit of always trying
to 'fire the first shot'; rush to release a chip that isn't really
perfected yet, just to grab the market.

Faggin figured this was stupid; it condemns you to always have the worst
chip on the market, and others will always take the market away from you
as soon as they get their product out. He couldn't convince Intel to
change, so he quit and started Zilog in 1974, taking a number of
engineers with him. The idea was to create a chip that was well enough
designed to have 'staying power' in the market. He succeeded; the Z80 is
the only CPU of that age that is still in mass production.
Post by Nate Edel
Post by Leon Howell
I think for what I want to do, the 4 Mhz Z80 is just as good as the
2 Mhz 6809.
It's hard to compare clock speeds of various CPUs. The Z80 to divide its
clock by about 4 ('about' because bus cycles can be 3,4,5 or more clock
cycles). The 6800/6502/6809 generally divide their clocks by 1 (though
some versions divide it by 4). So a "4 MHz" Z80 is roughly the same
speed as a "1 MHz" 6800/6502, because they are runnning at about the
same actual rate of instructions per second.
--
Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen
wild bill
2003-09-20 05:26:06 UTC
Permalink
Faggin .........................................
....................................................... started Zilog in 1974, taking a number of
engineers with him. The idea was to create a chip that was well enough
designed to have 'staying power' in the market. He succeeded; the Z80 is
the only CPU of that age that is still in mass production.
Lee;

Seems to me the RCA/Hughes 1802 is still being made/used, too,

And fur sure, as that's a CMOS part, that's the chip technology
we're all using these days; any idea what the first Intel parts
were? BTW I recently came across some 6502 CMOS parts.

I know I had some 8088 parts in CMOS, but wasn't that an NMOS
part originally? Maybe some NEC parts were also CMOS in the
early x86 line.

Check your Z80 references - I'd bet there aren't any 'current'
ones still being made in NMOS. Or PMOS. Or whatever.

Bill

Salle Arobase
2003-09-12 10:55:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leon Howell
Post by Salle Arobase
MP/M is a CP/M-compatible multi-user multi-tasking OS.
That's what I want. Where can I get a copy for my Bondwell Model 2?
All the MP/Ms (8-bit and 16-bit) use terminals connected
via PHYSICAL links. So, the first question is: "How much
serial lines can be connected to your computer?" This will
give you (almost) the number of users that will be able to
use MP/M on your system. I am not familiar with the Bondwell,
but I am afraid that it was not designed to handle several
serial interfaces (or has not the ability to receive several
cards, one for each additional user).

By the way, one of the regular of the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup,
"Bruce", want to design and build a small batch of MP/M II
systems... If you really want a MP/M II system, you could
add yourself to his customer list, and ready your money.
(For details, read the "New Z80182 System Progress" thread.)

(Else, the only way will be to find one old MP/M II system
still in working condition... Good Luck!)
Post by Leon Howell
Post by Salle Arobase
In my opinion, it is the most impressive piece of software ever
developed on an 8-bit CPU.
You should read about OS-9.
I know about the OS-9. But it does not run CP/M...
Post by Leon Howell
Here's some I forgot about: What are RP/M and RCP/M? Is CP/Net
an OS or an upgrade? What network protocols does it use?
You really ask lots of questions!

RP/M: I don't know. I know a TP/M, which was a clone of CP/M
on the Epson QX-10, but don't remember a RP/M.

As far as I know, "RCP/M" stands for "Remote CP/M system".
It was a CP/M-based bulleting board that you accessed with
XMODEM (typically), and left with BYE.

CP/NET is a Local Area Network (LAN) Operating System.
It is a set of subroutines that loads high in the TPA, and adds
new BDOS functions (dealing with the Network) to a CP/M 2.2
computer. It is also provided with a set of program to set up
the Network, "attach to the network", "detach", and send mail
to another "node" of the CP/NET (or DR NET) Network.
(But it dates from 1983, and its protocol (more or less based
on the Intel HEX file format) is almost certainly not recognized
by current Network hardware or software running under
Windows and Unixes.)

Wew!

When will it be your turn to say anything?

For example, about your Bondwell...

Yours Sincerely,
"French Luser"
Dosius
2003-09-14 06:53:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Salle Arobase
RP/M: I don't know. I know a TP/M, which was a clone of CP/M
on the Epson QX-10, but don't remember a RP/M.
RP/M was a hack of CP/M and a Z80/Z280 emulator to run it on a PC.
ISTR it being available from www.cpm.z80.de. I don't know if this is
what he's referring to, but I would suspect it might be.

-uso.
Salle Arobase
2003-09-17 12:03:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Salle Arobase
All the MP/Ms (8-bit and 16-bit) use terminals connected
via PHYSICAL links.
Does the built-in display & Keyboard count as a "physical" link?
No. This is what was implied by my use of the word "terminal"
(or "console", if you prefer). It must be able to display the characters
that it receives, and able to send back your commands. The
advantage of the teletype is that it leaves a trail of everything
displayed/typed on paper. The MP/M system can have its
own terminal but, usually, this is just one of the available terminals.
A reliable MP/M system can perfectly runs without a terminal,
just with terminals connected to it (for example, from another room).
(...) What's MP/M II?
Version 2 of MP/M.
Post by Salle Arobase
CP/NET is a Local Area Network (LAN) Operating System.
It is a set of subroutines that loads high in the TPA, and adds
new BDOS functions (dealing with the Network) to a CP/M 2.2
computer.
Can it be added to MP/M?
Yes, of course. As a matter of fact, CP/M 2.2 "nodes" can only
be "requesters". Only a MP/M system can be a "server".

The last version of CP/Net, Version 1.2, is compatible with
DR Net, so one Linux box running DR Net could be a
gateway to the Internet for a Network of CP/M 2.2 systems...

Yours Sincerely,
"French Luser"
Leon Howell
2003-09-17 18:53:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Salle Arobase
No. This is what was implied by my use of the word "terminal"
(or "console", if you prefer
So is it even possible to run MP/M on, for example, a Kaypro or
Bondwell with enough ram but no terminal connected?
Salle Arobase
2003-09-19 10:41:32 UTC
Permalink
Excuse me, Leon, but why are you insisting so much on
using a Bondwell 2?

I finally had a look to it on the Internet.

From what I have read, this is just a portable.

It is very far from the standard CP/M systems based
on the S-100 Bus standard (which would allow you
to easily add as much terminals as you want).

The only reasonable use I can think of your Bondwell 2
would be as a serial terminal running CP/NET v1.2
under CP/M 2.2, not as a MP/M II server.

(As far as I know, the company which built the biggest
number of MP/M systems is ALTOS. If I were you,
I would hunt for one of them in the USA.)

(By the way, if you are so much interested in MP/M,
you could open a Web site specialized in it... As far
as I know, the MP/M II guides are not online on the
Internet. However, CP/NET v1.2 is, along with CP/M 2.2,
on the Web pages of Roger Ivie. You will notice that
all the CP/NET doc mentions S-100 Bus cards...)

(I have heard that the company selling "Imsai mark 2"
systems would like to add a MP/M and CP/NET options
to its range of products (maybe this could interest you).
But they are probably much more expensive than a
second-hand ALTOS. However, they should run faster.)

Yours Sincerely,
"French Luser"
John Elliott
2003-09-10 16:25:41 UTC
Permalink
Leon Howell <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
: Please excuse my inexcuseable ignorance, but could someone please tell
: me *exactly* what CP/M+ & PCP/M do that CP/M 2.2 doesn't?

: I know CP/M+ can handle tons of ram, but how much, and is it really
: faster?

CP/M Plus supports the use of more than 64k. In theory it could use up
to about 15Mb or so (depending on how you set up the memory paging); most
implementations give it 128-160k and use whatever else they have as a
RAMdisk.
The extra memory gets used for disc buffers, so if the buffers are
allocated wisely it can improve disc access times.
The extra memory allows the use of a bigger BDOS than CP/M 2, with
features such as:
* Date/time stamps.
* Passwords.
* The System Control Block - an area of memory containing internal BDOS/CCP
settings. Some of these have their own BDOS calls to set/reset them;
others have to be accessed directly.

Similarly, the CCP is usually kept in memory rather than loaded in from
disc; it is also bigger than the CP/M 2 version and has features such as
conditional command execution, based on the return code from previous
programs [I improved this slightly in the Y2000 fixed version].

CP/M Plus also allows programs to remain resident in memory (RSXs) and
uses this to do I/O redirection and to implement the SAVE command.

: Is PCP/M really just menu driven CP/M+?

No. PCP/M-80 is a version of CP/M 2.2 (it reports version 2.8) with a few
of the extra BDOS calls from CP/M Plus, and a couple more of its own. It
requires a Z80 CPU (unlike the earlier versions which also work on the 8080)
and is designed so that it can be loaded from ROM.

: What does Z-System add?

Z-System was mainly for CP/M 2 systems. It consisted of a replacement CCP
(usually accompanied by a replacement BDOS) which could load additional
modules with more functionality. These usually included named directories
(ie, giving a drive/user area a title); flow control (conditional execution
of commands); execution of programs from within LBR files; etc.
There are a couple of Z-Systems for CP/M Plus, as well.

: Is MP/M an OS by it's self, or can it be added to CP/M+ or PCP/M?

MP/M is an OS. There are two versions for 8-bit systems - MP/M I and II.
They were written between CP/M 2.2 and Plus, and have some of the Plus
features and a further set all of their very own (nearly all the BDOS calls
numbered 128 and up).

: Can any of these multitask?

That's what MP/M does.
--
------------- http://www.seasip.demon.co.uk/index.html --------------------
John Elliott |BLOODNOK: "But why have you got such a long face?"
|SEAGOON: "Heavy dentures, Sir!" - The Goon Show
:-------------------------------------------------------------------------)
Lee Hart
2003-09-13 21:08:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leon Howell
I would also like some detailed info about T/Maker III, supposedly a
combination word proceccor, database & spreadsheet
I have "T/Maker" for CP/M-80, and used it for years. T/Maker for PC-DOS
was called "T/Master". It doesn't appear that they marketed versions
with different suffixes (I, II, III etc.), but they did sell variations
of the program for other computers, giving it various names (REPO,
GemWriter, and Tsitsuga, to name a few).

TM (for short) is a very interesting program. It is perhaps the very
first "integrated" program that combined an editor, word processor,
spreadsheet, spellchecker, database, etc. into a single package that had
logical consistent rules throughout.

The heart of TM is a text editor. Like Wordstar, HTML etc. it has a rich
array of special strings of characters that you put in your text that
tell TM what you want done with the file. Then, there are dozens of
'report generators' that read your text file, perform the desired
operations, and produce an output text file that you can print, do
further editing on, etc.

If you need more information, manuals, a demo, or the software itself,
email me directly.
Post by Leon Howell
and "Write Hand Man" (I may not have the name write) a set of
memory resident accessories.
Yes, you have the name right. It was written by Alan Bomberger at Poor
Person Software. I considerably enhanced it for the Heath/Zenith
H8/H19/H89 family of computers. Others did the same thing for Kaypros,
Osbornes, etc.

WHM (for short) is basically a 'Sidekick' clone for CP/M-80 computers.
It is a little TSR (terminate and stay resident) program that creates a
tiny reserved space in memory (about 5k) and then lives in it.

The memory-resident portion of WHM watches all keyboard input for a
'hot' key. When you type it, even while any other program is running,
WHM saves the state of the BDOS, and displays a menu of little utility
programs. There are utilities for a notepad, phonebook with dialler,
calculator, disk directory, etc. When you're done using these utilities,
WHM restores the BDOS and resumes executing whatever program was
running.

So (for example) I can be running Wordstar, and realize I need your
address. I hit the BREAK key (the 'hot' key on my H89), and the WHM menu
pops up. Press 4 for the PHONEBOOK utility, and I get what looks like a
Rolodex file on the screen. Press the FIND key and your name, and it
jumps to the page with your name. Press the COPY key to copy the address
to a clipboard. Now press ESCAPE to exit WHM, and I'm right back in
Wordstar, right where I left off. Press the PASTE key and the string of
text with your address is 'typed' in automatically; Wordstar inserts it
just as if I typed it on the keyboard.

I have WHM too, in case anyone is interested.
--
Lee A. Hart Ring the bells that still can ring
814 8th Ave. N. Forget your perfect offering
Sartell, MN 56377 USA There is a crack in everything
leeahart_at_earthlink.net That's how the light gets in - Leonard Cohen
Salle Arobase
2003-09-16 13:00:28 UTC
Permalink
I have "T/Maker" for CP/M-80, and used it for years. (snip)
TM (for short) is a very interesting program. It is perhaps the very
first "integrated" program that combined an editor, word processor,
spreadsheet, spellchecker, database, etc. into a single package that had
logical consistent rules throughout.
Lee, why not find its author, and ask him if he would mind releasing
its source code, or making a CP/M-86 version?

(It is funny how somebody who loves a software (like you)
can make it interesting... You should set up a Web page
dealing with it and your tricks!)

Yours Sincerely,
"French Luser"
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